K STADIUM White Paper – V0.97

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K STADIUM White Paper K STADIUM White Paper V0.97
June 3rd, 2022
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Copyright © KOK Foundation

Table of Contents

1. Executive Summary
2. Introduction
3. Background
i. Consensus Algorithms and DPoS
ii. Challenges of DPoS Platforms
4. Why K STADIUM
i. Governance
ii. Community Pool
iii. Technological Capacity
5. K STADIUM
i. Token Economics
ii. Stadium Owner(SO) & Community Pool
iii. Roadmap
6. Technological Background
i. Background: Ethereum & Layer 2 Solution
ii. Ground Chain – Hyperledger Besu
iii. MDL
iv. K STADIUM Bridge
7. Deployment & Services
i. Media & SocialFi Platform
ii. Game & NFT Platform
iii. Metaverse & Multiverse Platform
iv. e-Commerce & Payment Platform
8. Core Team & Strategic Partners
9. Legal notice

1. Executive Summary

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The KOK initiative has achieved numerous milestone achievements since its inception just three short years ago. Leveraging the merits of blockchain technology, it sought to address the monopolization of content services by global platform giants that have become household names. Furthermore, it has surpassed dissenting voices by merging with one of the powerhouses of the blockchain industry creating an unparalleled synergy of service and technology. As such, this white paper entails the details of that synergy in the form of KOK’s first mainnet to be called “K STADIUM.” KOK will continue to provide its existing services in token form, but the new mainnet will utilize KOK as an independent coin much like BTC or ETH. Furthermore, the new mainnet will consist of both public as well as private characteristics known as a “consortium blockchain.” And its consensus algorithm as well as governance will possess both centralized as well as decentralized characteristics to fulfill a diverse range of demands as the platform consistently grows. Whereas the KOK project has been fueled with pre-mined tokens, the new network will employ the existing DPoS consensus algorithm with a slight tweak, customized for K STADIUM.

A consensus algorithm is a protocol by which a network requires validators to come to a consensus on a given set of data. For example, the famous Bitcoin (BTC) network requires a PoW (proof of work) whereas Solana (SOL) employs the PoS(proof of stake) algorithm to address the issues of consumption and inefficiency of the PoW algorithm. But as many can guess, the proof of stake (PoS) algorithm too had issues as the system favors those who hold the highest number of coins and thus resulting in similar asymmetric, or centralized tendencies. Hence in order to get the most number of people involved, the DPoS (delegate proof of stake) was deployed so that even those with scarce holdings could still at least put in a vote for who they would like to be represented by. As mentioned in the previous section, K STADIUM will utilize the existing DPoS algorithm and combine elements of
“community” and “investment” that will allow for the community to function as a “VC” through the investment of its token-holding members. Thus, K STADIUM can be viewed as a “community driven, collaborative decentralized crypto VC.
K STADIUM will utilize a Stadium Owner, (SO) or block producer with three major roles pertaining to block validation, leader of governance through votes (delegated shares), and as an information hub. The SO will be delegated equity tokens of the K STADIUM token holder in the form of SOP (Stadium Owner Power), in exchange for tokens invested in the community pool. Further details regarding this structure will be covered in the latter part of this white paper.

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2. Introduction
Revenue from traditional business models based on centralized platforms traditionally go mostly to the owner, a reality far from that of one based on the merits of blockchain technology. Members who have participated in its initial network withsignificant contributions do not receive the appropriate rewards they fairly deserve. A “blockchain” based economy is one that keeps true to its core value of transparency and democratic elements, resulting in a fair and equal distribution of profits generated through the contributions of its participants.
The economic model pursued by K STADIUM can be seen as an “Inclusive Economy.” Accordingly, a reward system is needed to encourage all participants, or stakeholders, to contribute to the ecosystem and governance as well as to share the wealth produced by the ecosystem in a fair and just manner.
Once this prerequisite has been established, the next step is to consider how to maximize and leverage the profits generated resulting in a virtuous cycle of growth. While believers of game theory may adhere to a “zero-sum” economic principle, the blockchain economy is based on the “reverse game” theory where the sum of everyone’s gains and losses can equal to more than zero. Two core elements are necessary in materializing this principle: first, the collaborative effort of its community, and second, a self-sustaining token economy that continuously drives the platform forward.
The collaborative effort of participants signifies the individual’s dedication to the development of the network. This is made possible through positive behavior reinforcement, commonly in the form of compensation, or rewards. Accordingly, most blockchain based platforms traditionally generate tokens and rewards its users. And while a consistently growing token supply may seem attractive in some regard, a healthy token economy should ultimately be defined by its own driving force. An ecosystem that sits on a well-designed platform will allow for it to continuously expand simultaneously raising the overall value of the project.
One of K STADIUM’s major objectives is to implement a comprehensive blockchain model that distributes fair and just value to all participants, while gaining enough momentum to be its own driving force.

3. Background
While some aspects of blockchain’s DNA inherently rejects being controlled, management to a certain degree is inevitable. However, the scope and nature of that management is vast and diverse.
Many platforms operate on various governance model ranging from off-chain governance to on-chain based approaches. And while off-chain governance possesses traditionally “centralized” features such as in its decision-making process, ultimately, it’s the consensus algorithm that provides the basic framework of how the platform will be operated and governed. In this regard, the technology of differing approaches seems less significant than its intended purpose of improving upon and or, innovating existing processes.

i. Consensus Algorithms and DPoS
One of the first consensus algorithms to make its way into the spotlight is called “proof-of-work” (PoW), popularized through Bitcoin since its debut from 2009. However, the intense computing power necessary to participate in the network created demand for more efficient algorithms. This resulted in an improved algorithm called proof-of-stake, or PoS. In place of the significant computing power PoW required, the PoS approach generated blocks based on the number of coins a validator, or node has staked on the relevant network. While the energy issue seemed to be solved, its centralized structure of participant, or block producer selection raised enough concerns to go back to the drawing board resulting in yet another approach known as delegate-proof-of-stake, or DPoS. This latest algorithm still retained some of its predecessor’s centralized aspects, however, it provided the framework to allow more people to get involved through individual voting activities. Modeled after “representative democracy” the DPoS algorithm allowed for those with even the modest of holdings to participate, or vote. The votes go toward a
“representative” who is “delegated” authority on the individual’s behalf to oversee matters pertaining to the overall direction of the network, its security, and of course the core duty of block generation by validating, and ultimately reaching a consensus at which point a transaction would be complete. The search for a perfectly balanced and comprehensive algorithm can almost be seen as a “Whac-A-Mole” phenomenon in that issues will continuously arise as existing ones are addressed. And while it is difficult to measure the value of a consensus algorithm itself and the success or failure potential of a governance model through a singular criterion, the process of reflecting the opinions of members is as critical as the success of governance on the blockchain platform itself. Hence, a governance model that cannot fulfill both aspects may be faced with numerous roadblocks as the project and its network continuously grow. Now that the background of consensus algorithms has been somewhat established, let us dig deeper into the intricate and crucial mechanisms needed for this new DPoS approach to be sustainable.

ii. Challenges of DPoS Platforms
It takes more than just the “right” consensus algorithm for a governance model to be successful in the long term. While DPoS is the most appropriate algorithm to reflect the opinions of members, governance management in DPoS itself yet poses some challenges. Governance members can be largely divided into voters and representatives. More specifically, the voter’s main function, voting, is the critical activity which produces the “delegates” or representatives crucial to the DPoS process. In other words, governance cannot be achieved without voting. And while blockchain inherently assumes the “benign will” of individual participants, the good faith here is not some vague belief that humans are inherently good. It is based on the economic principle that participants will eventually act in the best interest of the community as long as those interests correlate with their own eventually. DPoS was designed with the logic that participants under the system will participate in the decision-making process for the public good of the network. However, looking at elections in real life, the majority simply will not make the effort due to sheer inconvenience. Even with well-designed reward programs, getting people to vote serves as a challenging task.
A representative DPoS platform, EOS, is a prime example that exposed the shortcomings of a DPoS approach. Out of the selected BPs, 21 become super nodes, or “Block Producers” who are compensated for their role of block generation, while the remaining BPs, or “Standby Producers” are compensated according to the number of votes they have received. Such rewards are modeled after EOS’ token economy of allotting 1% out of their annual 5% inflation resource.
Participants desiring to become BPs in the EOS ecosystem take on the role of node operation and information delivery to receive more votes and receive additional block production rewards. Rewards to the token holding individual, however, are not provided by the network itself, but through a 3rd party process explained below.
Individual token holders receive voting rights through staking, but do not receive rewards for the essential and necessary element, which is the vote itself. Ideal governance essentially anticipates members’ participation in decision-making for the future and positive development of the network in which one owns a stake. However, if said stake is not permanent, meaning if the network can be disrupted due to people leaving, there is a limit to the theory of “voter participation” for the public good of the network. Additionally, if there is no immediate reward for individual members taking the time out to vote, the reality of voting being a hassle may outweigh the ideology that members will ultimately vote for the good of the network.
Naturally, this has brought about a gradual decrease in EOS participants. To address this issue, a new model of voting agents called “proxies” took on the role of collecting voting rights for individual token holders while distributing the BP’s rewards for validations to voters as previously mentioned. Although this model seemed to solve the problem of rewards for voting, EOS governance is struggling due to the limit of rewards set by the EOS network itself (KRW 260,000 per year when delegating KRW 50,000,000), which can hardly be seen as a true motivator of the required activity itself.

4. Why K STADIUM
i. Governance
In the previous section, cases in which DPoS governance and its shortcomings has resulted in a gradual decrease in participation were discussed. This phenomenon poses risks of DPoS governance eventually leading to a potentially abandoned network. In this regard, it is safe to assume that the success of a governance model or its network largely depends on a solid driver of participation. Two critical elements were mentioned for a potentially successful governance model in the introduction: collaborative effort by the community, and a self-sustaining token economy. As such, what could qualify as a solid driver to activate and sustain the behaviors or mechanisms most difficult to achieve simultaneously most critical for the DPoS approach to be effective? The innate structure of a DPoS-based governance model allows for efficient authentication and validation resulting in unprecedented transaction speeds; however, its weakness is exposed when the token holder acts based on “individual benefit” as opposed to acting on behalf of the “community.” While there is no singular solution that will guarantee a perfect participation scenario, we have an agenda which we believe would be the most relevant to our initiative’s scope. We believe that the weakest link in the DPoS environment is the connection of the individual to the community. By this, we mean that the individual has the freedom to withdraw their stake at any given time regardless of financial benefit. However, a network where the individual’s identity strongly aligns with the community’s identity will have a higher probability of retaining its members through a value that outweighs abandoning the project. As such, another look at the EOS network and their 0.5% annual reward simply cannot outweigh the “hassle” of governance participation.
In K STADIUM, participation in governance is a direct investment decision, beyond changing the structure or interest rate of simple “tokenomics.” This decision is directly related to the direction of funds in the community. Thus, participation in the network carries more weight than just a “vote” to elect someone to decide on their behalf. Community and individual solidarity through investment is our solution to the weakest link of governance in a DPoS based environment.

ii. Community Pool
Venture Capital refers to financial capital that produces high capital gains by investing in potential start-up or venture companies. Start-ups receive investments to solve initial capital problems, and investors hope for a win-win scenario by receiving high yields on their investment should the company perform as projected. Solana is a representative blockchain platform that has received investment from a venture capital. Solana is expanding its ecosystem significantly by fostering Solana-based decentralized finance (DeFi), network-based games, and ecosystem-based startups with investments. Since it takes considerable cost and time to expand and develop the blockchain ecosystem, rapid growth is guaranteed if funds and manpower are secured through initial investment. However, it is not easy for companies to receive the so-called investments from venture capital.
As a result of this dilemma, K STADIUM has devised a system to collect investments from individual investors into a “community pool” and expand the ecosystem with investments from its participants. The community pool itself functions as a VC. The investment collected in the community pool is used to improve and update the system and supports services to be launched on the mainnet. The expansion of platforms to NFT, deFi, as well as the metaverse leads to high investment profits, and investment profits soon return to the expansion of the community pool, that is, growth in the VC itself. Larger investments lead to larger project planning and implementations than before, and growth in project size results in increased return on investment. Through this process, the platform will constantly expand simultaneously maintaining a virtuous cycle of expanding the community and increasing the profits of individual investors.

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K STADIUM seeks to address the issues of a DPoS based environment and encourages token holders to participate as decision makers that challenge the traditional investment concept at a direct or indirect level. The choice in direction of their investment is ultimately up to the community which allows for expansion of the community pool. Through the activation and expansion of community pools, platforms may secure a more diverse community, resulting in a stable and consistent growth of an expanding platform ecosystem. The investment of token holders is an active choice, a proactive contribution to decision making essential for the momentum of K STADIUM’s ecosystem.

iii. Technological Capacity
Regardless of an improved governance model, or a growing investment pool, ecosystem revitalization and expansion cannot be achieved without the required technology of the platform itself. Any online based system providing relevant services should be applicable to the blockchain platform. For service providers to implement competitive blockchain-based services online, they need the respective technological approach, which at times may be difficult to achieve on their own. A blockchain developer’s technical capabilities rely on the transaction processing speed required to expand the platform, the DApps that sit on the mainnet, as well as other 3rd party-based services. Boasting the world’s highest speed (TPS) based on MDL, K STADIUM Foundation’s technological capacity will play one of the key roles to its expansion.
K STADIUM’s developer has taken the existing consensus algorithm and has developed a new algorithm that addresses the issues in the existing one. The new consensus algorithm, called DPoI (Delegated Proof of Investment) aims to strengthen community functions in the existing DPoS by improving the existing DPoS algorithm, while also activating the community pool. The technical content of the DPoI algorithm can be found in the Yellow Paper, to be announced at a later date.

5. K STADIUM
i. Token Economics
a. KOK
The KOK token is the key currency of K STADIUM’s ecosystem and is used for investment, distribution, as well as rewards. The issuance and distribution of KOK tokens are determined by the token’s original value, transaction value, distribution volume, consumption, and has been designed to converge in order to maintain a certain supply. To do so, adjustment of the annual inflation rate and incineration policies my be leveraged. Changes to the overall token governance policy are established through the votes of the SOs (stadium owners) reflecting the community’s Voting power. However, before the introduction of the voting system and launch of the governance organization, there may be adjustments by the developer/operator regarding policy decisions or unanimous resolutions on the agenda. Furthermore, even after the launch of the governance organization, the foundation’s board of directors can participate in the policy decision-making process, mediate, or supplement, as such in case difficulties hinder prudent decisions attributed to poor governance participation.
The distribution ratio of inflationary KOK coins, inflation issuance, and the exchange ratio of SOP issued by inflation are partially fluid. The amount paid to the community pool and the amount allocated to the block reward are designed to vary with liquidity adjustments, changes in reward policies, and the size of the funds raised in the community pool. In other words, when the liquidity of the community pool is secured, block rewards is also increased by adjusting the inflation issuance allocated to the community pool, and conversely, when the funds of the community pool are depleted, the distribution ratio of community pool and block rewards may be readjusted.
Such an adjustment is to ensure the sustainability of the K STADIUM ecosystem by implementing growth and distribution policies in a fair and unbiased manner. K STADIUM’s rewards system is designed to allow all participants to contribute to this ecosystem and fairly share the wealth produced by the ecosystem according to the ideology of K STADIUM’s goal, which is an “Inclusive Economy.” Here, the allocation of block rewards corresponding its distribution is flexible. In other words, K STADIUM can temporarily or continuously increase the funds allocated to the community pool pertaining to the additionally issued tokens to attract more services and continuously promote the growth of the platform itself. In addition, distribution-focused coin allocation policies may be implemented to ensure that more rewards are paid to participants, namely SOs and SOMs, when services distributed on the platform start to stabilize.
Annual inflation: 2% based on issuance (Initial, inflationary issuances are subject to policy changes.)
Issuance: 5 billion (initial)
Additional inflationary tokens annually: 100 million (initial)
Distribution of Fixed Inflation:
20% to development/operations.
The ratio of block rewards to community pool rewards vary depending on the available funds in the community pool. As the community pool essentially represents the investment capital available on the platform, in case of deficiencies funds will be increased in order to attract higher quality projects. And in the case of an abundant community pool or just the opposite, block rewards distribution ratio is increased to distribute more rewards to investors.

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Operators can utilize the Open Source Software (OSS) developer community needed for the KSTADIUM ecosystem, and some of this developer distribution can be used as a reward for contributors to OSS activities.

b. SOP
SOP is the governance token of K STADIUM. The governance token’s primary role is to be used for voting by community members pertaining to K STADIUM governance, which is operated through smart contracts as well as through votes and cannot be traded based on the timeline of the recently published white paper (May 22), and can only be obtained from KOK’s Community Pool investment. If 1 KOK is remitted to the Community Pool, it will be exchanged for 1 SOP, and the SOP paid can be delegated to the Stadium Owner (SO), a leader verified with a delegable token, for compensation. Along with the delegation of the SOP, the right to vote is delegated, but the delegation does not mean transfer of value, so the SOP does not expire after the delegation. The SOP delegated to the SO is calculated as the Voting power proportional to the entire SOP. The exchange ratio of SOP and KOK is not a fixed value and can be changed for the purpose of controlling inflow and price adjustment

ii. Stadium Owner(SO) & Community Pool

1 Definition and role of SO.

SO, or Stadium Owner, refers to a block creator and node operator that executes the entire node of the K STADIUM ecosystem to verify each transaction made on the network. Anyone can apply for the SO role by submitting a separate application, and the SO plays three major roles.
A. Information provider organizing and announcing established policies.
B. The leader of governance who is delegated the shares of the delegator and votes directly for important policies.
C. Operator and validator of all nodes.
Additionally, as a large-scale investor of K STADIUM, the SO’s role is to promote various policies related to networks and proposals and encourage voting. Any K STADIUM user can apply for the SO role, but there are basic conditions that need to met. They need to be one of the top 100 investors and should be able to operate nodes in order to participate in the mainnet ecosystem.

2 SO & Voting Power
The ranking prioritization of an SO is carried out in the order of the SO ‘s equity ratio. The SO share is synonymous to (voting power) that can be exercised and is calculated as the ratio of the SO contribution to the total contribution.
$$ SO equity ratio (voting power) = (SO’s and delegated governance tokens) / (SO’s and community’s total governance tokens) $$
The higher the SO stake, or the higher the voting power, the higher the ranking among group leaders, and the higher the number of rewards according to ranking.

3 Roles and Control Flow

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The coin holder of the K STADIUM blockchain mainnet, or, the token holder invests his tokens in the community pool and receives a stake token (SOP) (Stadium Owner Power). The mainnet’s holder, who has received the equity token, can delegate the equity token (SOP) to the node operator, or the SO (Stadium Owner). SOs entrusted with equity tokens are ranked according to the number of tokens delegated to them. The role of SO according to the ranking may be modified by voting on the policy of the mainnet.
SOs that have not been put into block generation are broadcasted the agreed upon ledger through gossip protocols. In order to participate in the SO Pool, the retention of the entire ledger is a basic condition as well as being able to operate a node. And to ensure the performance of the entire network, the node server must meet server specifications (hardware and software) to participate in the SO Pool. The ranking of SOs may be performed for each predetermined period according to settings, referred to as a “round.” SO selection for the next round is carried out through a snapshot according to the amount of equity tokens held at a certain point in time when each round begins, and rewards for each round is paid at a certain point after the end of the round. Main net users, who have acquired equity tokens through community pool investments, can select SOs to delegate their equity tokens after reviewing public data such as ranking, rewards ratio, participation in previous rounds, voting (asset management, policy-making) and policy-making directions through voting.

4 Community Pool
The funds invested by K STADIUM in the community pool by KOK holders will be returned to the community pool. Funds from the Community Pool can be used as funds for system improvements and updates, such as technical updates to the mainnet (blockchain platform) and development of 3rd Party solutions for mainnet operation, and investors can make investment decisions in services to be launched on the mainnet through governance systems. According to each rewards rate, the return token obtained from the investment is paid, distributed, or returned back to the community pool for a set period of time.

5 Proposal
The KOK holder may proceed with a proposal by depositing a certain coin as a deposit. The minimum deposit amount for the proposal can be defined according to the policy, and in order to place the proposal on the voting list, a deposit of a certain amount must be maintained for a set period of time. When a proposal is registered in the voting pool, each SO will vote. The proposer can then register the proposal through the process of depositing a certain deposit, and the proposer’s deposit is refunded only if it is adopted through voting or approved by a certain number. This is a policy to prevent indiscriminate proposals and encourage participation.
The proposal process will proceed as follows:
A. Registration of proposal details and submission
B. Deposit stake
C. Voting
D. Passing of votes
Passing the vote is possible with the approval of at least 40% of the quorum and at least 50% of the votes excluding abstention. Failure to pass the vote will result in the incineration of the deposit used to register the proposal. If the vote is passed, the use of funds from the community pool will proceed depending on the proposal.

6 Voting
Mainnet voting is conducted by the SO. An SO can exercise as much voting rights as the SOP to which it has been delegated, and if one of the decisions (yes, no, abstain), is chosen voting rights as much as the proportion of SOPs are exercised collectively. SOs that deliberately do not participate in the vote may face disadvantages such as equity cuts, and if the SO’s stake is cut, the shares of the voters will also be cut at the same rate. Detailed regulations on cuts, or slashing, will be released in future versions.

iii. Roadmap
K STADIUM has implemented an investment system that includes a wallet function as a mobile app to lower the entry barrier to the blockchain environment. Its “app” characteristics makes it more accessible to the public and its structure allows for “dapps” to be expanded in various ways down the road.
To expedite swapping of assets pertaining to investments through K STADIUM, a DeFi service at the GroundChain level is currently in development. Through K STADIUM’s DeFi, users can explore various new assets through token linkage as well as DeFi derivatives resulting in additional rewards.
As the number of users increases, KSTADIUM will use MDL as a Layer 2 solution to provide a more practical user experience to accommodate the growing user base. Based on MDL’s high performance TPS speed and small fees, the launch of dApps in various sectors, i.e., games, metaverse, as well as additional NFT platforms will become a reality whereas performance and cost issues hindered them from being so. They will all be implemented on MDL, and will also be serviced through the KSTADIUM App.

6. Technological Background
i. Background: Ethereum & Layer 2 Solution
Blockchain scalability problems may be divided into two scopes: speed and commission. Existing versions have faced challenges in both areas. For example, Ethereum suffers from high transaction fees with low tps speeds. Ethereum’s average speed of 20 tps is significantly slower than that of Visa Card’s 24,000 tps. Currently, the wait-time required for internet users for games or electronic payments rarely exceeds a few seconds with low fees. Users who are accustomed to this internet experience have difficulties enduring the inherent limitations plaguing blockchain. In order to implement various extended services based on blockchain as well as provide users with the same user experience comparable to the internet experience, these two crucial issues needed to be addressed. To this end, a method of stacking another layer on the existing Ethereum chain (Layer 1) (Layer 2) has been devised. This increases speed by performing operations on layers outside the existing chain, recording and verifying transactions, and recording only the result values on the existing chain, while stabilizing the entire blockchain network to lower fees. This is called the Ethereum “Layer 2” solution, one of the solutions to the blockchain scalability problem. Representative Layer 2 solutions include Polygon (MATIC), OmiseGo (OMG), Synthetix SNX, and The Sandbox, a polygon-based game.

ii. Ground Chain – Hyperledger Besu
K STADIUM solves the scalability problem in a similar manner to the Ethereum Layer 2 solution described above. K STADIUM uses Hyperledger Besu as layer 1. The ground chain is superior in terms of usability and service scalability due to the usage of Solidity, the same development language as Ethereum, while showing better performance than Ethereum in terms of speed. However, performance issues still persist in being able to provide an internet-like experience to the user.

iii. MDL
The Medium Distributed Ledger (MDL) is based on Hyperledger Fabric, the most commonly used core blockchain system, and serves as K STADIUM’s unique software acceleration technology that improves Hyperledger Fabric’s performance(3000tps) by more than five times (15,000tps). The K STADIUM team first analyzed and tested transaction flows for each section of the Hyperledger Fabric, where bottlenecks across roughly 50 sections were exposed. Accordingly, various async techniques such as parallel processing of sequentially processed sections, reusage of repeated computational results through memory cache storage, and minimizing latency for DBI/O were employed to improve performance. Furthermore, MDL was recognized for its performance from KOLAS (Korea Laboratory Accreditation Scheme) through their measurement of tps, (transactions per second), transaction processing time (latency), transaction block transmission and reception time, as well as confirmation of normal operation through the establishment of an empirical environment.

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As mentioned in the previous chapter, the reason why existing Ethereum’s Layer 2 solution platforms can provide services such as games is due to its design in being able to provide superior speeds compared to Ethereum. K STADIUM employs MDL, which achieved the world’s best tps, higher than Ethereum’s representative sidechain, Polygon. MDL, consisting of Ground Chain’s sidechain, features much higher performance and lower fees than the existing blockchain. Furthermore, it requires immediate data processing and is expected to be particularly effective in payment, e-commerce, and game sectors where a high number of users need to access the network simultaneously. MDL composed of sidechains can utilize Medium’s bridge technology for exchange of transactions with Ground Chain and heterogeneous blockchain platforms or, may be configured to ensure completeness (finality) through the sidechain itself. It may be configured to check the completeness twice through anchoring technology on the ground chain as well.
Based on this MDL technology, K STADIUM is planning to expand its platform by designing several side chains connected to the ground chain. Due to MDL’s superior speed, game platforms, e-commerce platforms, media platforms, and the metaverse are implemented as services to form the entire K STADIUM ecosystem. These expanded platforms aim to provide the same user experience as the Internet beyond the speed and convenience provided by existing services.

iv. K STADIUM Bridge
The K STADIUM Bridge is a chain-to-chain asset transfer technology developed by The Medium. Currently, it is designed to change K STADIUM’s network from Ethereum to K STADIUM Ground Chain. When services such as MDL-based games, shopping malls, and the metaverse are launched in the future, K STADIUM Bridge technology enables free asset transfer from the Ground Chain in Hyperledger Besu to the side chain MDL-based platform.

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7. Deployment & Services
i. Media & SocialFi Platform
K STADIUM seeks to address arising issues from existing media such as YouTube, Facebook, Netflix, as well as Apple TV aiming to be a transparent blockchain-based media platform in a collaborative, decentralized format. The SocialFi platform forthcoming will be implemented in the form of a side chain of MDL

ii. Game & NFT Platform
Game developers of K STADIUM can create in-game items through the NFT protocol provided by MDL. Additionally, items created using the NFT protocol can be traded through the item DEX exchange within the platform. Developers can generate profits through transaction fees, and users can also receive rewards for game play through item transactions. K STADIUM’s game platform is based on decentralized blockchain technology and has the following characteristics:
Low commission
Decentralized curation
Game distribution and advertisement
NFT item trade
Payment service
User community activities
Development API/SDK

iii. Metaverse & Multiverse Platform
Various aspects of the metaverse based on augmented reality (AR) technology will be implemented in the form of a sidechain of MDL.

iv. e-Commerce & Payment Platform
Various forms of e-commerce implemented in existing internet economy can achieve more robust and inclusive economy in a decentralized blockchain economy. As one or more of these platforms form a sidechain platform on the MDL, K STADIUM will lead the true blockchain economy in the Web 3.0 era.

8. Core Team & Strategic Partners
Young Choe
Founder & Chairman of the Board/KOK Foundation
Author of “Blockchain Economy”, VP of Samsung Electronics SW Lab, Director of NVIDIA, Sr. VP of SK Hynix, Founder of Crypto Valley Lab
https://www.linkedin.com/in/young-choe-8033684/

Thomas Frey

Chief Advisor & Council Member/KOK Foundation
Founder and Executive Director of the “DaVinci Institute” in Colorado, USA, Google’s top-rated “futurist speaker,” and IBM’s most award-winning engineer

David Thaw
Council Member/KOK Foundation
Professor at the University of Pittsburgh
Affiliated Fellow, Information Society Project, Yale University Ph.D., J.D., University of California, Berkeley
https://www.linkedin.com/in/dbthaw/

Joel Comm
Council Member / KOK Foundation
A pioneer in the internet sector since 1995
Best-selling author of 15 books and inductee into the “Guerrilla Marketing Hall of Fame”
Recommendation committee member & Co-host of more than 700 broadcasts on two top cryptocurrency channels.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/joelcomm/

Jill Carrigan
Council Member / KOK Foundation
Media marketing company, IngleDodd MEDIA COO
Serial entrepreneur
Blockchain educator/instructor
https://www.linkedin.com/in/jill-carrigan-entertainment-guilds/

K STADIUM Pte. LTD, Singapore
KOK platform development, operations, content curation and operations. Managing Director : Elina Yurina
https://www.linkedin.com/in/elina-yurina-80536998/

Medium Inc., Korea
Development and maintenance pertaining to KOK mainnet technology
https://themedium.io/

9. Legal notice
The K STADIUM coin does not have the legal nature of securities or stocks. Therefore, it can not grant any rights to dividends and profits. Thus there is no refund program at the completion of a sales transaction. Since K STADIUM coins do not have the nature of stocks, holding K STADIUM coins does not guarantee the right to attend the K STADIUM Foundation meeting. The K STADIUM coin does not guarantee specific rights or values outside the blockchain platform. Therefore, K STADIUM coins cannot be used as speculation or investment goals. This white paper is not legally binding and does not constitute any contractual relationship. Efforts are made to provide accurate information on the contents of this white paper, however the relevant information is subject to change with no legal responsibility for its accuracy and or its completeness. Investors must make a project investment decision by conducting a thorough investigation of related information and regulations on their own, and the investors themselves must be familiar with the relevant laws of the competent country. Acquisition and storage of K STADIUM coins may include various risks. These risks include: K STADIUM Foundation launching a blockchain, failing to improve its technology, or providing the above-mentioned services. Therefore, before acquiring K STADIUM coins, all users and investors should carefully consider the risks, prices, and benefits of acquiring K STADIUM coins. If necessary, we ask you to seek opinions from experts regarding this scope. Buyers who do not understand or cannot accept these risks specified in the terms and conditions clause are discouraged from purchasing K STADIUM coins. A white paper prepared by the K STADIUM Foundation (or Company) provides information related to the launch of a coin proposed to a potential buyer of a K STADIUM coin (or token).